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Recent News

17th Annual Vision Research Symposium

Presented by the Center for Vision Research and Institute on Aging “Mitochondrial Function and Metabolism in Aging and Vision” McKnight Brain Institute DeWeese Auditorium (LG-101A) December 8, 2014, 8:00-5:00  …

Dr. Boye featured in Genzyme/Sanofi Press Release

The collaborative efforts between Dr. Boye and Genzyme to develop a gene therapy for GUCY2D LCA1 were recently featured in a press release. A link to the aritcle can be found here: http://news.genzyme.com/press-release/genzyme-collaborates-gene-therapy-rare-disease-causes-childhood-blindness…

Genzyme Collaborates on Gene Therapy for Rare Disease that Causes Childhood Blindness

Genzyme, a Sanofi company (EURONEXT: SAN and NYSE: SNY), today announced the establishment of a research collaboration with the University of Florida and the University of Pennsylvania to develop a gene therapy for the treatment of a rare genetic disease that causes childhood blindness. Leber congenital amaurosis type 1 (LCA-1)…

The Boye lab grows by two!

The team is happy to welcome its two newest members. In August, postdoctoral associate Shreyasi Choudhury, Ph.D. and laboratory assistant Tyler McCullough, M.S. joined the group. They bring with them valuable experience in vision research and have already proven to be integral parts of our operation. Welcome Shreyasi and Tyler!…

Examining advances in AAV vector for retinal gene therapy

Much work is being done with Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors for application in retinal gene therapy, with modifications being made to the capsid and genome of the vector to generate novel variants with unique transduction profiles, according to Shannon Boye, PhD…

UF Health researcher receives grant to combat severe form of childhood blindness

It’s usually in the first few months that parents of newborns with Leber congenital amaurosis realize something is wrong. The babies fail to focus on their parents’ faces, may be abnormally sensitive to light or have unusual eye movements. Parents then receive the devastating diagnosis: severe, permanent visual impairment.